Why did it take 7 hours for Air Corps to arrive at wildfire scene?

first_imgA full Government report into delays in mobilising the Air Corps to fight West Donegal gorse fires is being demanded.The Department of Defence was contacted about yesterday’s raging fires at approximately 9.30am.However, it took more than 7 hours to scramble the helicopter from Baldonnell to arrive in Donegal around 5pm last evening. The delay has been described as “shocking” by Deputy Pat the Cope Galagher.“It is absolutely shocking the delays which occurred before the Aer Corp helicopter arrived on the scene of the gorse fires in West Donegal, the delay in mobilising the helicopter certainly left the entire situation very dangerous, and potentially threating to numerous properties and indeed life in the areas of the fires.“The efforts of Donegal Fire Service have to be publically acknowledged along with the massive number of local volunteers who fought the fire for hours, and the numerous farmers who provided slurry tanks for quenching the fires.“A private helicopter was also on site from earlier in the afternoon which was arranged by Donegal County Council. When the Aer Corp helicopter did arrive, it played a significant role in controlling the fire. “But, the issue here is why it took a full 7 hours to get the helicopter cover, which was so badly needed earlier in order to control this raging inferno that threatened property and life in West Donegal.”The initial alarm and emergency call for Aer Corp assistance was made by Donegal County Council at 9.30 am, that was followed shortly afterwards by Deputy Gallagher contacting the Minister of State for Defence Paul Kehoe.He addd “I maintained constant contact with the Minister and Officials, unfortunately the contact was all initiated from me, and very little response was being returned by them to me in the course of the day.“What is devastating for all of us involved in this sequence of events – is that it took 7 hours to get the helicopter on site, critical and crucial time was lost whereby the fire could have been better managed had the numerous firefighters and local volunteers got the Aer Corp back up which was requested earlier on.”The Dungloe-based politician said he is demanding of An Taoiseach & Minister for Defence Leo Varadkar along with Minister of State Paul Kehoe to order a full written report as to the background and circumstances which led to the delay. He fumed “It is simply just not good enough that such a delay could occur, critical time was lost in fighting this fire with the necessary Air Support that was so desperately needed and which was self- obvious from early morning was going to be required to manage a fire of this magnitude.“Serious breaches of protocols have occurred here in this case, we are fortunate that no lives were lost – only for the fact of the massive local voluntary effort along with the entire Donegal Fire Service being on site working endlessly to fight this fire – massive property loss would have occurred albeit one house was lost to the fire.”He said the Defence Minister and the Minister of State need now to conduct this examination into what exactly occurred here, compile a detailed Report into the circumstances and make it known publically.He added that otherwise, it is only a matter of time until a similar situation arises again, and we cannot countenance a similar massive time delay in mobilising the Aer Corp in the interests of public safety. He added “We must learn from the massive mistakes of today’s fire and ensure that robust protocols are in place that better manages wildfires – by ensuring that Aer Corp cover is provided when requested by a Fire Service within an acceptable time period along with Army support, these will be the basic requirements of any agreed protocol.”Why did it take 7 hours for Air Corps to arrive at wildfire scene? was last modified: April 26th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more


Elections 2019: Liam Blaney wins Milford seat

first_imgLiam Blaney has secured his seat in the new Milford Electoral Area in the 2019 Local Elections.The Fianna Fáil farmer was voted in on the third count with 1986 votes. Speaking to Donegal Daily, Blaney said: “I’m delighted, it was a tough campaign. There was a lot of untruths told during the campaign, but I’m delighted with the good solid vote I got.”The long-serving councillor said he had to fight for his vote for various reasons this year. “I had a candidate stand in my parish for the first time. And with the stories I’ve been told, people were claiming things that I have nothing to do with, it made it difficult. But our people stood up to the challenge and the proof of that today is in the vote I got.”This is Liam Blaney’s fourth election, and he said that he is hoping there will be more to come. John O’Donnell was elected to Milford EA on the first count earlier today. But the battle is heating up for the third seat. Noel McBride from Fine Gael was eliminated following Blaney’s victory. Now it’s all down to Maria Doherty (SF), Ian McGarvey (IND) and Eimer Friel (FG). Whether Friel can get over the line with the distribution of McBride’s votes remains to be seen.Follow the Donegal Daily LIVE election blog: https://www.donegaldaily.com/2019/05/26/donegal-daily-local-elections-2019-live-updates/ Elections 2019: Liam Blaney wins Milford seat was last modified: May 26th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more


Want to be a citizen Earth scientist? Join GLOBE Observer

first_imgClouds are more than water and a muse. They play an important role in regulating the temperature of the planet. Now NASA’s new GLOBE Observer app makes it easy for us all to be guardians of the planet.Data collected by the users of NASA’s GLOBE Observer app gives climate scientists a more holistic view of the the changing planetary environment. (Image: GLOBE Programme)Did you spot a dramatic and surfable Morning Glory this morning? Has your day been filled with cumulus, nimbostratus or stratocumulus? These are just a few of the 10 basic types of cloud. Depending on whether they are clumps or layers or streaks, if they’re low, mid-level or high, clouds fit into different species as well.All of them are water – tiny droplets in low clouds and ice crystals in high. And yet, they have captured the imagination of artists and been the muse to poets. They have helped adults while away the day and inspired children with crayons.They also play an important role in controlling the temperature of the planet and its climate system by reflecting sunlight back into space or trapping heat coming from the surface in the atmosphere. “Clouds are one of the most important factors in understanding how climate is changing now and how it’s going to change in the future,” says Holli Rieneek Kohl, an education and outreach officer at NASA.She is also the NASA lead in its GLOBE Observer programme. NASA’s Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) is a two decade-old science and education programme. Schools and students in 110 countries participate through observations of their local environment. Global data is collated and their observations are used to give a clearer view of the global environment.The appIt is now easer to join thousands of global citizen scientists. All you need is a smartphone, the great outdoors and NASA’s new GLOBE Observer app. South African citizen scientists can join the GLOBE community by downloading the app. They will join a global community building a cache of scientific data about local environmental conditions. For South Africans it is a continuation of the country’s storied involvement with NASA. A history that goes back to the agency’s moon landing expeditions. The GLOBE Observer app ties in with South African National Space Agency (SANSA) mandate to promote awareness and an interest in science, engineering and technology. The app allows the programme to grow beyond the classroom and allows anyone anywhere to become a planetary guardian.The app is available as a free download (Image: GLOBE Programme)South Africa has felt the effects of climate change recently with unprecedented drought and unseasonal temperatures. NASA is encouraging citizens around the world to participate in its programme to track these global climate changes by downloading the app and sharing their data with a global audience.For now the app allows users to collect photographs of clouds, which are sent to NASA to form a web of global climate data. A secondary benefit is, NASA hopes, a public more aware of the world outside their homes. The information collected is added to satellite-generated information to create a more holistic data archive.Kohl explains: “NASA studies clouds from satellites that provide either a top view or a vertical slice of the clouds. The ground-up view from citizen scientists is valuable in validating and understanding the satellite observations. It also provides a more complete picture of clouds around the world.”For scientists data is everything, but collecting that data is rarely cheap or easy, especially when the whole world is your laboratory. For NASA’s climate scientists, ground measurements are critical to confirm their measurements taken from space.Erika Podest, a NASA Earth scientist based at its world famous Jet Propulsion Laboratory, explains: “There are some places in the world where we have no ground data, so citizen scientists can greatly contribute to advancing our knowledge of this important part of the Earth system.”Collected data is automatically sent to the GLOBE data and information centre, where it is available to scientists and students studying the planet. But NASA, and Kohl, want to encourage app users to also interact with other users around the globe.Download the app, create an account, follow the tutorial and you are ready to start making observations. Use the drop down menu to record atmospheric conditions – whether the sky is clear, cloudy or obscured by things such as rain, fog or dust – then classify the clouds. The app auto-fills local time and date and co-ordinates.The app will help users to align their camera along compass points and how to best tilt your phone to capture most of the sky. You need a smartphone, but an internet connection is not necessary while taking pictures of clouds. You can submit your data once you have a connection.last_img read more


Australian teams named for the 2014 Trans Tasman Series

first_imgTouch Football Australia is pleased to announce the Australian Men’s, Women’s and Mixed Open teams that will play New Zealand in the 2014 Trans Tasman Series from Friday, 25 April until Sunday, 27 April at the Glen Willow Regional Sporting Complex in Mudgee, New South Wales. Nine players will debut for Australia in the Series, with several players also returning to the teams after a few years away. The Australian teams will be looking to win back the prestigious Trans Tasman trophy following their loss to New Zealand in the 2013 Super Trans Tasman Series, with the Women’s team the only side of the three to claim their division. Last time the teams played in Mudgee at the 2012 Trans Tasman Series, Australia were 3-0 series winners. The 2014 Trans Tasman Series is the last time the Australian and New Zealand teams will meet before the 2015 Federation of International Touch (FIT) World Cup in Coffs Harbour in April/May next year. TFA wishes to congratulate the following players who have been named in the Australian teams for the 2014 Trans Tasman Series. Australian Men’s Open TeamWillie BishopStuart BriertySam BrisbyScott BuckleyDrumayne Dayberg-MuirTerry DeeganNick GoodTim GoodDylan HennesseyBen MoylanRob NakhlaPete NormanJonathan PalauMatt ProwseSteve RobertsMatt TopeAustralian Women’s Open TeamNicole BeckKristin BossElizabeth CampbellDanielle DavisSamantha HopkinJessica McCallSarah PeattieLeah PercyKirsty QuinceAshleigh QuinlanPeta RogersonCatherine SargentSarah SpacieClaire TandekMarikki WategoLouise WinchesterAustralian Mixed Open TeamScott BundySimon LangMichael LawJustin MitchellCameron NichollsSebastian ReyMichael SinghDean SpringfieldDylan ThompsonTrent ToumaKristy BrennanKylie HilderPatricia MichaelopoulosElin MortimerLaura PeattieSamantha RodgersRelated Files2014_australian_teams_announcement-pdfRelated LinksAussie teams announcedlast_img read more


Dabo Swinney Yelled At Refs In The Tunnel After First Half Clock Controversy

first_imgDabo Swinney celebrates and talks to an ESPN reporter.dabo swinney hype video clemsonClemson ended the first half with a 44-yard field goal attempt that was blocked by Alabama and fell short. The Tigers were forced to burn their final timeout and lost an additional play after referees somehow allowed several seconds to tick off the clock after a first-down completion.The refs are taking heat for this on social media, and Clemson head coach Dabo Swinney made sure to let them know they messed up on his way into the locker room. In hallway on way to locker room, Dabo Swinney screamed repeatedly at officials “you made us use a time out” on late first half scenario— Brett McMurphy (@McMurphyESPN) January 12, 2016Our only hope? That clock snafu and the points it might have cost Clemson doesn’t end up costing the Tigers the game in the long run.last_img read more


Correction EPARadiation Rollback story

first_imgWASHINGTON – In an early version of a story Oct. 2 about EPA regulation of radiation, The Associated Press reported erroneously in a headline that EPA says a little radiation may be good for you. As the story made clear, that assessment came from scientific outliers, including one quoted by EPA in a news release. The headline was changed in later versions of the story.A corrected version of the story is below:Experts say Trump’s EPA moving to loosen radiation limitsExperts say Trump’s EPA is moving to loosen radiation limitsBy ELLEN KNICKMEYERAssociated PressThe EPA is pursuing rule changes that experts say would weaken the way radiation exposure is regulated, turning to scientific outliers who argue that a bit of radiation damage is actually good for you — like a little bit of sunlight.The government’s current, decades-old guidance says that any exposure to harmful radiation is a cancer risk. And critics say the proposed change could lead to higher levels of exposure for workers at nuclear installations and oil and gas drilling sites, medical workers doing X-rays and CT scans, people living next to Superfund sites and any members of the public who one day might find themselves exposed to a radiation release.The Trump administration already has targeted a range of other regulations on toxins and pollutants, including coal power plant emissions and car exhaust, that it sees as costly and burdensome for businesses. Supporters of the EPA’s proposal argue the government’s current model that there is no safe level of radiation — the so-called linear no-threshold model — forces unnecessary spending for handling exposure in accidents, at nuclear plants, in medical centres and at other sites.At issue is Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed rule on transparency in science.EPA spokesman John Konkus said Tuesday: “The proposed regulation doesn’t talk about radiation or any particular chemicals. And as we indicated in our response, EPA’s policy is to continue to use the linear-no-threshold model for population-level radiation protection purposes which would not, under the proposed regulation that has not been finalized, trigger any change in that policy.”But in an April news release announcing the proposed rule the agency quoted Edward Calabrese, a toxicologist at the University of Massachusetts who has said weakening limits on radiation exposure would save billions of dollars and have a positive impact on human health.The proposed rule would require regulators to consider “various threshold models across the exposure range” when it comes to dangerous substances. While it doesn’t specify radiation, the release quotes Calabrese calling the proposal “a major scientific step forward” in assessing the risk of “chemicals and radiation.”Konkus said the release was written during the tenure of former EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. He could not explain why Calabrese was quoted citing the impact on radiation levels if the agency does not believe there would be any.Calabrese was to be the lead witness at a congressional hearing Wednesday on the EPA proposal.Radiation is everywhere, from potassium in bananas to the microwaves popping our popcorn. Most of it is benign. But what’s of concern is the higher-energy, shorter-wave radiation, like X-rays, that can penetrate and disrupt living cells, sometimes causing cancer.As recently as this March, the EPA’s online guidelines for radiation effects advised: “Current science suggests there is some cancer risk from any exposure to radiation.”“Even exposures below 100 millisieverts” — an amount roughly equivalent to 25 chest X-rays or about 14 CT chest scans — “slightly increase the risk of getting cancer in the future,” the agency’s guidance said.But that online guidance — separate from the rule-change proposal — was edited in July to add a section emphasizing the low individual odds of cancer: “According to radiation safety experts, radiation exposures of … 100 millisieverts usually result in no harmful health effects, because radiation below these levels is a minor contributor to our overall cancer risk,” the revised policy says.Calabrese and his supporters argue that smaller exposures of cell-damaging radiation and other carcinogens can serve as stressors that activate the body’s repair mechanisms and can make people healthier. They compare it to physical exercise or sunlight.Mainstream scientific consensus on radiation is based on deceptive science, says Calabrese, who argued in a 2014 essay for “righting the past deceptions and correcting the ongoing errors in environmental regulation.”EPA spokesman Konkus said in an email that the proposed rule change is about “increasing transparency on assumptions” about how the body responds to different doses of dangerous substances and that the agency “acknowledges uncertainty regarding health effects at low doses” and supports more research on that.The radiation regulation is supported by Steven Milloy, a Trump transition team member for the EPA who is known for challenging widely accepted ideas about manmade climate change and the health risks of tobacco. He has been promoting Calabrese’s theory of healthy radiation on his blog.But Jan Beyea, a physicist whose work includes research with the National Academies of Science on the 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, said the EPA science proposal represents voices “generally dismissed by the great bulk of scientists.”The EPA proposal would lead to “increases in chemical and radiation exposures in the workplace, home and outdoor environment, including the vicinity of Superfund sites,” Beyea wrote.At the level the EPA website talks about, any one person’s risk of cancer from radiation exposure is perhaps 1 per cent, Beyea said.“The individual risk will likely be low, but not the cumulative social risk,” Beyea said.“If they even look at that — no, no, no,” said Terrie Barrie, a resident of Craig, Colorado, and an advocate for her husband and other workers at the now-closed Rocky Flats nuclear-weapons plant, where the U.S. government is compensating certain cancer victims regardless of their history of exposure.“There’s no reason not to protect people as much as possible,” said Barrie.U.S. agencies for decades have followed a policy that there is no threshold of radiation exposure that is risk-free.The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements reaffirmed that principle this year after a review of 29 public health studies on cancer rates among people exposed to low-dose radiation, via the U.S. atomic bombing of Japan in World War II, leak-prone Soviet nuclear installations, medical treatments and other sources.Twenty of the 29 studies directly support the principle that even low-dose exposures cause a significant increase in cancer rates, said Roy Shore, chief of research at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, a joint project of the United States and Japan. Scientists found most of the other studies were inconclusive and decided one was flawed.None supported the theory there is some safe threshold for radiation, said Shore, who chaired the review.If there were a threshold that it’s safe to go below, “those who profess that would have to come up with some data,” Shore said in an interview.“Certainly the evidence did not point that way,” he said.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which regulates electronic devices that emit radiation, advises, broadly, that a single CT scan with a dose of 10 millisieverts may increase risks of a fatal cancer by about 1 chance in 2,000.Supporters of the proposal say it’s time to rethink radiation regulation.“Right now we spend an enormous effort trying to minimize low doses” at nuclear power plants, for example, said Brant Ulsh, a physicist with the California-based consulting firm M.H. Chew and Associates. “Instead, let’s spend the resources on minimizing the effect of a really big event.”last_img read more


Articles 370 35A should be reviewed scrapped Rajnath

first_imgLucknow: Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh Sunday said Articles 370 and 35A should be seriously reviewed and scrapped. While Article 370 gives autonomous status to Jammu and Kashmir, Article 35A allows the Himalayan state’s legislature to define permanent residents of the state. Speaking at a voters’ awareness programme here, Singh attacked National Conference leader Omar Abdullah for his recent remarks that there should be a separate prime minister for Kashmir. “When a person, who has occupied a Constitutional post says such things, then Articles 370 and 35A should be seriously reviewed. Since these (provisions) have mostly caused losses, Articles 370 and 35A should be scrapped.” Singh said, “There is a conspiracy in Jammu and Kasmir. Some organisations want to kindle the feelings of separatism among the people, but majority want to stay with India. Barring three-four organisations, the rest are with India” The Lok Sabha MP praised PM Narendra Modi. International Monetary Fund has endorsed that India is growing at rapid speed, he said.last_img read more


IAF chopper on PM Modi duty makes emergency landing

first_imgPratapgarh (UP): An IAF helicopter on a mission to review the security at Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s rally venue on Wednesday developed a technical fault and made an emergency landing on the outskirts of the district here, police said. All persons onboard the chopper were safe. “The helicopter used for reviewing the secret security of the rally of Prime Minister Narendra Modi developed a technical fault and made an emergency landing at around 1.00 pm in Barapur village under Jethwara police station, 30 km from here after certain technical glitches were noticed,” Superintendent of Police S Anand said. Police rushed to the spot where the chopper had landed as soon as they got the news, he added. The prime minister, who addressed two election rallies in Ayodhya and Kaushambi on Wednesday, is likely to woo voters of Pratapgarh on Friday.last_img read more


Houston You Have A New Point Guard Jeremy Lin

Jeremy Lin, the point guard who slept on his brother’s couch as he crafted one of the most dynamic 35-game stretches in NBA history, was allowed to walk from the New York Knicks to the Houston Rockets Tuesday night.The team that gave Lin the opportunity to emerge from a nobody on the bench into an international somebody – even gracing the cover of Time magazine — elected to not match a three-year, $25.1 million offer sheet he signed with the Rockets. So in essence, the player that charged “Linsanity” and the millions of off-the-court marketing and sponsorship dollars walked from the Knicks without the team receiving any compensation.Knicks sources and coach Mike Woodson said for a week that the team would match any offer to retain Lin. And considering Knicks owner James Dolan had doled out enormous money to the likes of Eddy Curry, Larry Brown and Isiah Thomas, it seemed reasonable to assume he would do so to keep Lin, a worldwide phenomenon. But, in the end, Dolan considered Lin is too expensive.Lin took to Twitter when it became official. “Much love and thankfulness to the Knicks and New York for your support this past year…easily the best year of my life#ForeverGrateful.”“Extremely excited and honored to be a Houston Rocket again!!#RedNation,” Lin added in another tweet.A team source told ESPNNewYork.com earlier this week that the third year of the Rockets’ offer — worth $14.8 million — caused the Knicks to consider letting Lin go. If the Knicks had matched the offer, they would have been subject to a luxury tax in the third year, potentially bringing their total out-of-pocket cost for the team’s salary to about $43 million in 2014-15.The Rockets’ offer to Lin would pay him $5 million in the first year, $5.225 million in the second and $14.8 million in the third, according to sources.The Knicks, realizing a $30-million penalty in Year 3 of the contract that would come with matching the offer,  made a sign-and-trade deal to acquire another point guard, Raymond Felton. Felton played one season with the Knicks, but it was nowhere near as exciting as Lin’s New York stay.Lin, 23, was a revelation, performing brilliantly for a stretch that included 38 points in a win over the Los Angeles Lakers on national television and hitting the game-winning shot at Toronto. In between, he was mostly steady, although he did have a turnover problem. He averaged 14.6 points, 6.2 assists and 3.1 rebounds in 35 games with 25 starts before his season was cut short because of surgery to repair torn cartilage in his knee.An undrafted guard out of Harvard, Lin was cut twice in the preseason, once by Houston, and played in the D-League, before leading the Knicks to seven consecutive wins that electrified the city and the Asian community. His rise earned him a significant raise, from $788,000 last season to $5 million this season.His departure has sparked much debate among media and fans in New York, a debate that will rage for quite some time. read more


Kareem AbdulJabbar Blasts Stereotype All Athletes are Cheaters Amid

(Wikimedia Commons)Kareem Abdul-Jabbar has heard about the Cleveland Cavaliers star Tristan Thompson cheating on Khloé Kardashian. He’s also heard people say that Kardashian should have seen it coming due to his athlete status and he wants folks to know that’s the wrong way to think.The retired NBA star explains the issue with boxing athletes as cheaters in a Monday, April 16 essay for Cosmopolitan, saying it’s still bad even if it doesn’t compare to making a sexist joke or buying into racist stereotypes.“This is a pervasive opinion people have of pro athletes — and not even the worst one,” he wrote of unfaithful pro-players. “But that doesn’t make it true or acceptable. Imagine how different the response would be if the comment were, ‘He’s Black.’ But athletes are expected to accept the insulting stereotypes, shut up, and dribble.“This offensive characterization is in no way on par with the much worse stereotyping of women, people of color, Muslims, Jews, immigrants, and the LGBTQ community,” he continued. “But when we allow any prejudice to pass unchallenged, we endorse all prejudice. That smarmy joke about dumb blondes that a colleague tells at lunch demeans all women. That ‘observation’ about smart Asian students or gay flair or rapist immigrants endorses an environment of lazy thinking that carries over into other decision-making that is ultimately detrimental to society. When we hear casual stereotyping and say nothing, we collude in the detriment.”After acknowledging the role confirmation bias plays into pushing forward the notion that athletes are all cheaters, Abdul-Jabbar also admitted that sports stars from all kinds of games have had their share of indiscretions.“What makes the Khloé Kardashian situation more poignant — and more ripe for tabloid fodder — is that this is not the first time she’s been publicly cheated on, not even the first pro athlete to cheat on her,” he said, possibly referring to Rashad McCants, who claimed the cheating story was made up for TV.“Certainly, wealth, power, and fame give athletes, politicians, musicians, actors, and filmmakers more opportunities to be unfaithful to their spouses,” Abdul-Jabbar continued. “But availability is no excuse for availing. Nor is it okay to use the bad behavior of some to characterize all. I’m not here to defend or condemn Tristan Thompson’s actions. If people feel the need to judge him, let them do so based on his behavior, not his profession or gender.”Meanwhile, folks on Twitter have been giving their take on the 71-year-old baller’s essay.“Right, so it’s our fault this stereotype persists, we make them cheat by our micro-aggressions,” someone said. “Got it. It’s a form of stereotyping, therefore a form of #racsim and so on, blah, blah, blah.”“Well they need to stop cheating so they aren’t stereotyped… if the shoe fits, buy a matching shirt,” someone else said.“Lol, but why isn’t this stereotype pushed on actors, musicians and politicians too?” someone else wondered. “They cheat just as often? Why not criticize the home wreckers, groupie, and gossip sites that take advantage of often false rumors to defame celebrities?” read more