Ontario teacher guilty of pushing antivaccine views suspended for talking to media

first_imgAn Ontario high school science teacher who was found guilty of professional misconduct after pushing anti-vaccination views says he was suspended without pay for three days for speaking to the media about the case.Timothy Sullivan said he received a letter from the Grand Erie District School Board that said he had breached the ethical standards of the Ontario College of Teachers.“You have drawn your employer, the board, into the media attention,” said the letter, dated April 20 and signed by superintendent of human resources Scott Sincerbox.“The result of that is that the board’s image in the public domain has been negatively impacted.”Sullivan said he served his suspension last week.In February, the southwestern Ontario teacher attended a public hearing at the Ontario College of Teachers in Toronto.The college accused Sullivan of professional misconduct for his actions on March 9, 2015, when he shouted at a public health nurse administering vaccines at his high school and accused the nurse of withholding information from students receiving vaccinations.The proceeding also heard Sullivan asked a student if they knew that one particular vaccine could cause death.An independent disciplinary committee of the college found the teacher guilty of five offences, including abusing students psychologically or emotionally. He is awaiting sentencing from the college, which is seeking a suspension for one month, completion of an anger management course and a public reprimand.Sullivan denies the allegations from that case, despite his finding of guilt, and is confused about the suspension for speaking with the media.“I didn’t think it was actually hidden. The charges against me were on the Ontario College of Teachers website, the hearing dates were published in advance and the hearing itself was public,” Sullivan said in an interview with The Canadian Press.“Yet, I’m hesitant to talk because that’s an odd letter and here I am talking to the media.”In the letter, Sincerbox chastised Sullivan for speaking to reporters during the college’s two-day hearing, calling the media attention “excessive.”“Tim, your actions brought unnecessary publicity and attention to the matter,” Sincerbox wrote. He also wrote that the board was not looking for a repeat of “the unwanted media attention.”Another line from Sincerbox’s letter that sounded ominous to Sullivan read: “Please note that future incidents of this nature may lead to further discipline, up to and including dismissal.”Sullivan said he turned to the media because his union, the Ontario Secondary School Teachers Federation, dropped his case and didn’t attend either the hearing with the college or the meeting with the board.The union said it would not comment on the matter.Sincerbox declined comment in an email citing employee confidentiality.During the hearing with the college, the school’s principal at the time testified that parents and students had complained about Sullivan’s views on vaccination in the past, adding the teacher had told his pupils there is a link between vaccines and autism — a view that is widely denounced by the scientific community.Is he against vaccines?“I won’t say I’m anti-vaccine, as it does seem like they’ve had some benefit over the years, but the number of them and the ages of — no, I’m going to end it there,” Sullivan said. “I’m pro informed consent, let’s leave it at that, OK?”last_img read more


Weve Had Mixed Success Predicting LeBrons Moves

Our most recent take on James was last summer, after the Heat won their second consecutive NBA championship. We looked at the odds of James catching up to Michael Jordan’s six championship wins, the most in the salary-cap era (since 1984-85). We put the odds of the Heat winning the 2014 championship at about 33 percent, with the chances getting lower each subsequent year. So given this year’s loss, James might be making a smart move with his current opt-out. But given James’s win shares, we put his odds at winning a championship — regardless of the team — at about 20 or 25 percent. We were partially right — Wade and Bosh did show solidarity in a move to Miami. But we were wrong in predicting James’s decision. In a follow-up piece, we further evaluated the merits of James joining the Heat. There was a major hit to his popularity because of the way he announced the decision and because of Miami’s relatively small fan base. We argued this could have reduced his earning potential by $150 million. We conceded that “James may able to redeem himself through athletic success,” which turned out to be the case: He made $42 million from endorsements in 2013, which dwarfs the $28 million he made in 2009 when he was with Cleveland. The world is abuzz with the news that LeBron James is opting out of his contract with the Miami Heat. There’s plenty of speculation about what this means and where he might decide to go, if anywhere, but we thought it might be interesting to take a look at our own history of guessing James’s future. Here’s a roundup of predictions that we’ve made, and how accurate they turned out to be:The last time James opted out of his contract was in 2010, when he left the Cleveland Cavaliers and signed with the Miami Heat, joining Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh there. Before he announced that decision, we analyzed his value as a player, as well as the different options available to him, and tried to determine the best route for him to take with regard to his personal brand. We decided he’d be best off trying to both win a championship and do so in a way that would be perceived as overcoming a challenge. We doubted that “forming a ‘dream team’ with Wade and Bosh in Miami would do that much for him,” so it was most likely that he would stay with Cleveland or join the Knicks, while Wade and Bosh would stick together in either Chicago or Miami. read more


WILMINGTON REC REMINDERS Take An Ocean City Getaway This Spring

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a recent announcement from the Wilmington Recreation Department:Our travelers will boil it down for you – “just pay the Recreation Department the money, and then all you have to do is show up!”If you’re looking for a nice escape this Spring, consider a jaunt to Ocean City with Wilmington Recreation on Tuesday through Friday, May 28 – 31!We take care of all the details – once you’re registered you can sit back, relax and enjoy this wonderful tour! We’ll be staying right on the beach in Ocean City. This mid-Atlantic seaside resort town features miles of shoreline, a boardwalk lined with shops and restaurants, and proximity to Assateague Island, home to wild ponies. We’ll tour Ocean City and the Assateague Island National Seashore, we’ll explore the Victorian town of Berlin and we’ll visit a Life-Saving Museum. We’ve got evening entertainment including a Magic Show one night, and the option to visit the Ocean City Casino another night. We’ve got lots of fun activities included, as well as some down time so you can enjoy some R & R on your vacation, whether you want to walk the beach, shop or enjoy the indoor or outdoor pools at the hotel.Our package includes round trip motor coach transportation, 3 nights accommodations, 6 meals, admission fees, a Tour Director, taxes and gratuities (except Tour Director and Driver). $645 p.p.d.o.To register, or if you have any questions, please call the Wilmington Recreation Dept. at 978-658-4270.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWILMINGTON REC REMINDERS: Mother’s Day Gift Ideas From The Recreation DepartmentIn “Community”WILMINGTON REC REMINDERS: Day Trip To New York City On October 19In “Community”WILMINGTON REC REMINDERS: Perfect 10-Day Trip For History Buffs Set For SeptemberIn “Community”last_img read more


Almost 80pc Rohingyas want to go back

first_imgRohingya refugees walk on the muddy path after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Teknaf. Reuters file photoMore than 90 per cent Rohingyas, who have taken shelter in Bangladesh, personally witnessed or directly experienced violence in Myanmar on or after 25 August, says a survey.The crackdown by Myanmar authorities since then led to a rapid mass migration of more than 647,000 Rohingya to enter Bangladesh, confirmed the “Rohingya Survey-2017” that documented the atrocities against Rohingya Muslims.However, 78 per cent of the Rohingya refugees surveyed said they would willingly return if the situation improves. About 16 per cent had no desire to return and only 6 per cent would return home unconditionally, the survey added.Xchange, an international organisation engaged in generating data to advocate better knowledge of human migration, conducted the survey based on interview with 1,360 ethnic Rohingyas between 15 September and 15 October in seven different refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar.The survey said the large number of respondents willing to return to Myanmar could, in part, be explained by the fact that there are very few opportunities for Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.The survey pointed out that generations of Rohingya refugees staying in the camps following previous expulsions from Myanmar continue to live in poverty.Almost 100 per cent (96% to be accurate) respondents stated that the Myanmar military were the perpetrators of these abuses. Fifty one per cent reported that local ethnic Rakhine ‘extremists’ were involved.However, the involvement of ethnic Rakhine civilians was usually in a supportive role to the military, said the survey. “These civilians attacked Rohingyas, burned buildings, and committed other violent crimes that had the effect of driving Rohingyas away from their homes,” the survey added.last_img read more