Second generation Bahamian 13 Phillip Dorsett playing in NFL Superbowl for New

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#UnitedStates, February 4, 2018 – Minneapolis – Miami born and raised, 25 year old Dorsett who joined the Patriots in September is the son of Nassau man, Howard Dorsett and grandson to Exuma man, Thomas Dorsett (said to be from Williams Town, Ex).With the final score of 41-33, the Bahamian descent, wide receiver will have to settle for a loss tonight as the Philadelphia Eagles take Superbowl LII.#MagneticMediaNews#PhillipDorsett#SuperBowlLIIPhoto credit: MM fan Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #PhillipDorsett, #SuperBowlLIIlast_img read more


Mauro Icardi downplays Real Madrid move

first_imgInter Milan captain Mauro Icardi insists he’s far from done at the club yet, despite reported interest from Real MadridThe Argentine striker has been linked with Real for the past few months, amid their struggles in front of goal.Since leaving Barcelona in 2011, Icardi has become one of Europe’s most prolific goalscorers with 117 goals in 200 Serie A matches.And Icardi has continued his fine form this season with 10 goals in 15 appearances for Inter across all competitions.Despite the talk of a move to Real though, Icardi’s sole concern lies with Inter’s 2018/19 campaign.Maurizio Sarri, JuventusMaurizio Sarri satisfied despite Juventus’ draw at Fiorentina Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Maurizio Sarri was satisfied with Juventus’ performance on Saturday afternoon after finishing a tough game at Fiorentina 0-0.“I don’t think this is the right time, given the results,” Icardi told Corriere dello Sport on leaving Inter.“I’ve always made my goals clear: first, to return to the Champions League with Inter, and we’ve done that.“Second, to win something with Inter. The [sporting] director [Piero Ausilio] has made a good team despite not being able to spend a lot.”Inter are third in the Serie A and in Group B of the Champions League – where they have just one game left to book a spot in the knockout stages.Icardi is contracted to Inter until June 2021.last_img read more


Almost 80pc Rohingyas want to go back

first_imgRohingya refugees walk on the muddy path after crossing the Bangladesh-Myanmar border in Teknaf. Reuters file photoMore than 90 per cent Rohingyas, who have taken shelter in Bangladesh, personally witnessed or directly experienced violence in Myanmar on or after 25 August, says a survey.The crackdown by Myanmar authorities since then led to a rapid mass migration of more than 647,000 Rohingya to enter Bangladesh, confirmed the “Rohingya Survey-2017” that documented the atrocities against Rohingya Muslims.However, 78 per cent of the Rohingya refugees surveyed said they would willingly return if the situation improves. About 16 per cent had no desire to return and only 6 per cent would return home unconditionally, the survey added.Xchange, an international organisation engaged in generating data to advocate better knowledge of human migration, conducted the survey based on interview with 1,360 ethnic Rohingyas between 15 September and 15 October in seven different refugee camps in Cox’s Bazar.The survey said the large number of respondents willing to return to Myanmar could, in part, be explained by the fact that there are very few opportunities for Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh.The survey pointed out that generations of Rohingya refugees staying in the camps following previous expulsions from Myanmar continue to live in poverty.Almost 100 per cent (96% to be accurate) respondents stated that the Myanmar military were the perpetrators of these abuses. Fifty one per cent reported that local ethnic Rakhine ‘extremists’ were involved.However, the involvement of ethnic Rakhine civilians was usually in a supportive role to the military, said the survey. “These civilians attacked Rohingyas, burned buildings, and committed other violent crimes that had the effect of driving Rohingyas away from their homes,” the survey added.last_img read more


Wisconsin Ohio California among states targeted by Russian hackers

first_imgA sign marking the location of the polling station for the Wisconsin presidential primary election is seen at the Milwaukee Police Safety Academy in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, U.S. April 5, 2016. Reuters File PhotoWisconsin, Ohio, California and 10 other states said on Friday they were among 21 states that Russian government hackers targeted in an effort to sway the 2016 presidential election in favour of Donald Trump though no votes were changed.The Department of Homeland Security confirmed it had notified the states of the activity but declined to identify them. Russia has denied election meddling, and president Trump has denied any collusion with Russia.Alabama, Alaska, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Minnesota, Texas and Washington state also confirmed they were targeted by Russian hackers but said they were not successful. Arizona and Illinois confirmed last year that they were targets.The Associated Press confirmed Iowa, Maryland, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Oregon, Oklahoma and Virginia were also targets, bringing the total states identified to 21. Those states did not immediately return messages seeking comment late Friday.“There remains no evidence that the Russians altered one vote or changed one registration,” said Judd Choate, president of the U.S. National Association of State Election Directors.Wisconsin Elections Commission Administrator Michael Haas said Homeland Security told the states that “Russian government cyber actors” targeted state voter registration systems.Homeland Security officials have said that in most of the 21 states only preliminary activity was observed from hackers and a small number of networks were compromised. Some states had complained in June they had no idea if Russians had attempted to infiltrate their systems.California Secretary of State Alex Padilla said Friday that hackers had scanned state election systems but not breached the system. “It is completely unacceptable that it has taken DHS over a year to inform our office of Russian scanning of our systems, despite our repeated requests for information,” he said.Homeland Security spokesman Scott McConnell said in a statement the government believes “officials should be kept informed about cybersecurity risks to election infrastructure” but also wants to protect “the integrity of investigations and the confidentiality of system owners.”U.S. intelligence agencies have concluded the Kremlin orchestrated an operation that included hacking and online propaganda intended to help Trump win, Reuters reported in August.Senator Mark Warner, a Virginia Democrat who co-chairs the Senate Cybersecurity Caucus, said Friday in a statement it is “unacceptable that it took almost a year after the election to notify states that their elections systems were targeted.”He said officials must inform states of attempts to enter election systems “just as any homeowner would expect the alarm company to inform them of all break-in attempts, even if the burglar doesn’t actually get inside the house.”Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams said DHS told it that its systems were scanned in the weeks before the 2016 election. “A scan is similar to burglars jiggling the doors of a house and moving on when they realise the doors are locked,” the state said.Washington state’s top election official, Kim Wyman, said the state learned in 2016 of attempted intrusions from Russian internet addresses and immediately alerted the Federal Bureau of Investigation.The list of targets includes battleground states like Wisconsin, Ohio and Iowa, but other key states like Michigan said Friday they were told they were not targeted. It also included states that were not seriously contested like California and Texas.Wisconsin was one of a handful of battleground Midwestern states that helped Trump win the presidency over Democratic rival Hillary Clinton. Trump carried the state by 22,748 votes, or about 0.8 of a percentage point. Many of the other states were not seriously in contention in the 2016 race.Several congressional committees are investigating and special counsel Robert Mueller is leading a separate probe into the Russia matter, including whether Moscow colluded with the Trump campaign.last_img read more


After North Koreas ICBM Launch Now What

first_imgAPNorth Korean state media reported that Kim Jong Un “personally ordered” an ICBM test this week, a milestone for the country’s nuclear program.On the 4th of July, North Korea marked a milestone by firing an intercontinental ballistic missile that soared high into space before turning around and landing in the sea near Japan. The North’s state media said the missile, Hwasong-14, flew 933 km (580 miles), reaching an altitude of 2,802 km (1,741 miles) and flew for nearly 40 minutes.The successful test of a missile of this kind, which could theoretically put Alaska within its range, is something President Donald Trump earlier this year said “would never happen.” Now that analysts — including those in the U.S. military — confirm it did, the world is grappling with what to do next.“Testing an ICBM [intercontinental ballistic missile] represents a new escalation of the threat to the United States, our allies and partners, the region and the world,” Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said in a statement Tuesday night. “Global action is required to stop a global threat.”In the short term, the 15-member states of the U.N. Security Council will meet on Wednesday. This is the body that has imposed numerous sanctions packages on North Korea, which have proven ineffective in getting North Korea to change its behavior so far.The threat, dubbed “the worst problem on earth,” has persisted across U.S. administrations and only grown more alarming over time. Former President Barack Obama warned President Trump during the transition that North Korea was the most urgent and vexing problem to confront.As president, Trump has met with leaders in the region — Japan, China and South Korea — but so far has stayed on the same policy course as the Obama administration. The Trump administration has pursued a goal of de-nuclearization and increasing pressure via sanctions and working with regional neighbors.Now, given the symbolic importance of North Korea’s technological milestone, as well as the political leverage it earned by reaching it, the rest of the world is in a tighter box in dealing with Pyongyang.Generally, the options fall into a few baskets:Isolating North Korea further with economic sanctions and pressure from regional neighborsMilitary movesDiplomatic engagement, which would require accepting Pyongyang as a nuclear-armed state.Sanctions and China“Sanctions regimes are miserable failures until they’re not,” said Mark Lippert, the most recent U.S. ambassador to South Korea, in his exit interview with NPR.But despite “tough-on-paper” sanctions designed to stop the flow of nuclear weapons material into North Korea as well as deliver economic punishment on the regime, the latest research shows the numerous countries expected to enforce the sanctions aren’t doing so — because they’re too complicated to implement, private businesses independently aid North Korea (knowingly or not) and Pyongyang has grown increasingly deft in evading sanctions as it’s become more isolated.“Not a single component of the U.N. sanctions regime against North Korea currently enjoys robust international implementation,” Andrea Berger of the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies wrote last month.For his part, President Trump still seems fixated on having neighboring China, North Korea’s largest trading partner, handle the problem.“Hard to believe that South Korea and Japan will put up with this much longer. Perhaps China will put a heavy move on North Korea and end this nonsense once and for all!” he tweeted Monday night.That both overestimates China’s influence on Pyongyang and its willingness to put on “heavy moves,” though it’s unclear what Trump means by heavy moves.But tensions between the U.S. and China have grown in recent weeks, following the U.S. Treasury Department’s sanctions on a Chinese bank accused of helping North Korea and an arms sale to Taiwan, which mainland China views as a renegade republic.Trump admitted last month in a tweet that his hope of getting China to rein in North Korea “has not worked out,” but after the ICBM test on Tuesday, he again wondered aloud about Chinese help.“Catastrophic” military optionsEach of the strategic options for the North Korea issue present drawbacks, though military moves — an attempt at regime change, a decapitation strike on Kim Jong Un or a limited strike to try and destroy weapons — are far more potentially deadly than others.Defense Secretary James Mattis has said outright war with North Korea would be “catastrophic” and “probably the worst kind of fighting in most people’s lifetimes.”If threatened, North Korea wouldn’t have to use nuclear weapons at all — just its artillery — to attack Seoul, a mega-city with a metro population of nearly 24 million. South Korea also hosts some 28,000 American troops.Other ideas being floated: downing North Korea’s electrical grid and possibly shooting down North Korean missiles in their boost or ascent phase. But it’s not clear the U.S. has that capability right now.Acceptance and engagementA week ago, former Secretary of State George Shultz, former U.S. ambassador to the U,N. Bill Richardson and former Defense Secretary William Perry joined others in a letter urging the administration to go beyond the current pressure tactics of escalating sanctions and isolation, and instead engage in talks with North Korea.“Tightening sanctions can be useful in increasing pressure on North Korea, but sanctions alone will not solve the problem,” the letter cautioned. “Pyongyang has shown it can make progress on missile and nuclear technology despite its isolation.”During a trip to Seoul in March, Tillerson ruled out engaging North Korea in talks unless Pyongyang showed a commitment to de-nuclearize. This follows the Obama administration line. But North Korea has shown no willingness to abandon its nuclear program, especially since its advancing technology has only served to strengthen its position globally.South Korea’s new President Moon Jae-in has indicated he’s willing to talk with North Korea with the aim of just getting to a freeze of its nuclear program. So far, North Korea has balked at that, too. But a growing chorus of North Korea observers say that given the advancements to date, it’s past time to just talk in the hopes of getting somewhere with this intractable problem.“We need to have serious conversations amongst ourselves and with allies about what we’re willing to trade. Because so far, there has been no price that was worth paying to stop their program,” says Melissa Hanham, a researcher with the James R. Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies.This, of course, presumes that North Korea wants to meet in the first place, something that recent back-channel negotiators doubt. “There was absolutely no flexibility or willingness to meet to talk about their nuclear program,” says Sue Mi Terry, a former CIA analyst and National Security Council director for Korea who recently met with North Korean officials to try to get nuclear talks back on track.Trump, in a tweet, said of North Korea’s Kim Jong Un: “Does this guy have anything better to do?”The reality is that in his short tenure as North Korea’s leader, Kim has done a lot to put far richer and stronger nations in an increasingly difficult spot.Jihye Lee contributed to this story. Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more